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Golden Mile/Míle Órga, Léim

A stunning walk with breathtaking views of Connemara
id_3918569
Difficulty: Moderate
Length: 1.3 miles
Duration: Less than 1 hour
Family Friendly

Overview :  The Oughterard Culture and Heritage Group took the top prize for its Míle Órga at Leam at the 2009 County Council award ... more »

Tips:  This is the West of Ireland so be prepared for rain. Sensible shoes are a must. Great photo opportunities

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Points of Interest

Fáilte go Míle Órga Léim.
In the past, in order to reach Leam people had to jump (léim) across the river and this is how the area got its name. Later, a stone bridge was built and this has brought fame to the place as it featured in the “Quiet Man” starring John Wayne and Maureen O Hara which was filmed in the... More

2. Old School House

In 1852 Christopher St George - a landlord in the area who resided at Tyrone House, Kilcolgan - gave the site to Fr Kavanagh, PP of Oughterard, for the purpose of erecting a new school. At that time, approximately 100 children were attending school in a leaky cabin on the mountainside which, in turn, had replaced a hedge school of Penal Times. ... More

3. Galway Clifden Railway Line 1895-1935

The shed opposite the church was used as an office for the Railway. The next road junction is part of the old Galway /Clifden Railway line which opened in1895. The Railway line was a relief project supported by Arthur Balfour who had been appointed Chief Secretary for Ireland in March 1887. The local landlords, the Martins of Ross and the O’... More

4. The Gatekeeper’s Cottage

The cottage on the left at the road junction was the Gate Keeper’s residence. It was one of 18 such cottages built at public road level crossings along the route. Each cottage had a living room and two bedrooms as well as a small porch at the front. Outhouses consisted of a fuel shed and toilet. It was his/her duty to open the gates to allow the... More

5. Connemara Ponies - Quiet Man Stud.

The owner breeds Connemara ponies – docile friendly animals, good for working, noted for its hardiness and agility, easy to handle and world renowned for its natural jumping and dressage abilities.

Exact origins are uncertain but native ponies could have bred with horses from Spain and Morocco in the distant past. “Cannon Ball” is a local... More

6. Dry Stone Walls,

Dry Stone Walls
Stonewalls are a feature of the area – there is no concrete or cement holding them together. Look closely and you will see daylight between the stones. The spaces between the stones allow the strong winds to pass through so that the walls do not fall down.

7. Turn Right, and walk down a step hill with wonderful views of lake and mountain

8. Hedgerows and Famine Ridges.

The hedgerows are typical Irish hedgerows. A wealth of native trees and shrubs – brambles, gorse, fuchsia, hawthorn, ash, sycamore, heather, rowan, sally and oak grow in this hedgerow. Many of the plants have seeded naturally in the shelter of the stone walls. Some seeds may have been dropped by a bird or a mouse, have floated on the wind or have... More

9. Blanket Bogs

The high rainfall and the cool climate of the area provide ideal conditions for the blanket bogs of the landscape. They are shallow bogs of 1.5m in depth. Long ago turf was cut by hand with a special tool called a ‘sléan’ and was later raised up or footed to dry in the sun and wind. Large baskets called ‘creels’ and animal drawn carts were... More

10. The old Galway to Clifden Railway Line

The old Galway /Clifden Railway line which opened in1895. The Railway line was a relief project supported by Arthur Balfour who had been appointed Chief Secretary for Ireland in March 1887. The local landlords, the Martins of Ross and the O’ Fflaherties of Lemonfield were influential in bringing the railway in this direction. Mitchell Henry of... More

11. Sign Marking the Railway line, Showing Oughterard railway Station C.1930

The old Galway /Clifden Railway line which opened in1895. The Railway line was a relief project supported by Arthur Balfour who had been appointed Chief Secretary for Ireland in March 1887. The local landlords, the Martins of Ross and the O’ Fflaherties of Lemonfield were influential in bringing the railway in this direction. Mitchell Henry of... More

12. Sign Marking end of "Golden Mile"