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Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague

U stareho hrbitova 243/3a | 110 00, Prague 110 00, Czech Republic
+420 222 749 211
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Permanent exhibition Children's Drawings from the Terezin Ghetto Located on the first floor, this exhibition focuses on the fate of Jewish children who were incarcerated in the Terezin ghetto during the Second World War. It is based on the now world famous children's drawings that were made in the ghetto between 1942 and 1944 under the supervision of the artist Friedl Dicker-Brandeis. These emotionally powerful drawings bear testimony to the persecution of Jews during the Nazi occupation of the Bohemian lands in 1939-45. They document the transports to Terezin and daily life in the ghetto, as well as the dreams of returning home and of life in the Jewish homeland of Palestine. The vast majority of the children perished in the gas chambers of Auschwitz-Birkenau. The Pinkas Synagogue is part of the Jewish Museum in Prague. The Pinkas Synagogue is the second oldest preserved synagogue in Prague. Bbuilt in the late Gothic style in 1535, it was founded by Aaron Meshulam Horowitz, a prominent member of the Prague Jewish Community, and probably named after his grandson, Rabbi Pinkas Horowitz. It was originally a place of prayer for the Horowitz family and was located near a ritual bath (mikveh). It was restored to its original form in 1950-54. Memorial to the Bohemian and Moravian Victims of the Shoah In 1955-60 the Pinkas Synagogue was turned into a memorial to the nearly 80,000 Jewish victims of the Shoah from Bohemia and Moravia. One of the earliest memorials of its kind in Europe, it is the work of two painters, Václav Boštík and Jiří John. After the Soviet invasion of 1968, the memorial was closed to the public for more than 20 years. It was fully reconstructed and reopened to the public in 1995 after the fall of the Communist regime.
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LOCATION
U stareho hrbitova 243/3a | 110 00, Prague 110 00, Czech Republic
Josefov
CONTACT
Website
+420 222 749 211
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Reviews (599)
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1 - 10 of 269 reviews

Reviewed 1 week ago

Of all the sites included under the Jewish Museum ticket, Pinkas Synagogue was my favourite. Located right next to the Cemetery, the rooms and walls with names of those who have died in the Holocaust is substantial, and incredibly moving. One of my favourite parts...More

Thank lysmekah
Reviewed 1 week ago via mobile

I had not originally planned to visit but as it came with the ticket for the Spanish Synagogue we decided to go to the Pinkas and the Jewish Cemetary. I am so glad we visited. It is breathtaking and terrible. It's one of the most...More

Thank Kayleigh T
jewishmuseminprague, Manažer komunikace at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this reviewResponded 6 days ago

Thank you very much for your visit, we will be happy to welcome you again.

Reviewed 1 week ago

Enjoyed - if that's the right word - looking around the Pinkasova Synagogue. Thousands and thousands of names of victims of the Holocaust are engraved on the walls. It's very striking and very powerful. For me they need some stories of individuals to illustrate the...More

Thank captaincookYorkshire
jewishmuseminprague, Tým podpory webu TripAdvisorFront Office Manager at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this reviewResponded 6 days ago

Thank you for your visit, the Pinkas Synagogue i one of the earliest memorials of its kind in Europe, and an impressive one, as such the Jewish Museum in Prague is not a Holocaust Museum, and the memorial is a part of a broader exhibition....More

Reviewed 2 weeks ago

This is an eye-opening place which is part of the Josefov Jewish Museum collective. It is the holocaust memorial which is emotive to say the least. Walls within this synagogue are embellished with the names of those taken from Prague and the surrounding areas by...More

Thank NickandJulie
jewishmuseminprague, Tým podpory webu TripAdvisorFront Office Manager at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this reviewResponded 1 week ago

synagogue and the Robert Guttmann gallery. For more information, please see our website. Thank you for your review. We are glad JMP impacted you in this way and we will look forward your next visit!

Reviewed 3 weeks ago

It is one of the "must see" places of Prague. Unfortunately there is not too much possibility to deeply think what happened to the Jews - there are hundreds of keen tourists for whom it is only a place where they were directed, but they...More

Thank 545medva
jewishmuseminprague, Tým podpory webu TripAdvisorFront Office Manager at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this reviewResponded 1 week ago

Thank you for your review, we will be happy to welcome you again.

Reviewed 3 weeks ago

As the second oldest synagogue in Prague, the Pinkas Synagogue has a considerable amount of history behind it. By far the most prominent aspect is the Holocaust memorial, which commemorates over 78,000 Czech Jews. The memorial is simple in its presentation but startlingly powerful, with...More

Thank Jim T
jewishmuseminprague, Tým podpory webu TripAdvisorFront Office Manager at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this reviewResponded 1 week ago

Thank you for your review, we also recommend to do a guided tour for more in-depth information. We will be happy to welcome you again!

Reviewed 4 weeks ago

the first thing you see upon entering the first floor is the walls with the names handscribed. words cannot describe it. you have to see it for yourself. in all there are nearly 80,000 names on the walls. found our surname. and then upstairs the...More

Thank al g
jewishmuseminprague, Tým podpory webu TripAdvisorFront Office Manager at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this reviewResponded 1 week ago

Thank you very much, we are happy you enjoyed your visit and we´ll be pleased to welcome you again in the Jewish Museum in Prague

Reviewed 4 weeks ago via mobile

This brings reality home. The walls are covered with the victims of the Holocaust 1939-1945/6. A very poignant reminder of past atrocities that mankind is capable of.

Thank iceman_icestreet
jewishmuseminprague, Tým podpory webu TripAdvisorFront Office Manager at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this reviewResponded 1 week ago

Thank you very much, we are happy you enjoyed your visit and we´ll be pleased to welcome you again in the Jewish Museum in Prague

Reviewed 5 weeks ago

Pinkas Synagogue was one of the most moving memorials to honor the victims of the Holocaust. The white walls with each victims names written very neatly are extremely moving. The children's art display left everyone in our party crying. This is a must see.

Thank John M
jewishmuseminprague, Tým podpory webu TripAdvisorFront Office Manager at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this reviewResponded 1 week ago

Thank you very much, we are happy you enjoyed your visit and we´ll be pleased to welcome you again in the Jewish Museum in Prague

Reviewed 15 July 2017 via mobile

This memorial is beyond somber. It is crushing. The names of thousands inscribed on the walls of those who were murdered during WWII. Entire families. And the children...all the children. My heart wept.

Thank CreateSF
jewishmuseminprague, Tým podpory webu TripAdvisorFront Office Manager at Pinkas Synagogue, Jewish Museum in Prague, responded to this reviewResponded 1 week ago

Thank you for your review. We will look forward your next visit!

Nearby
Josefov
Josefov houses Prague’s Jewish community. This small
neighbourhood centered around Široká street is
completely surrounded by Staré Město (Old Town). As
the former Jewish Ghetto, today all that remains are a
few synagogues and the oldest surviving Jewish
cemetery in Europe. The narrow streets were once small
enough that a person could touch the houses on both
sides. You can still feel the dignity and history this
...More
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Questions & Answers
traveler9519
10 July 2016|
AnswerShow all 3 answers
Response from jewishmuseminprague | Property representative |
The prayer is "El malei rachamim", a funeral prayer used by the Ashkenazi Jewish community. The chazzan recites it, for the ascension of the souls of the dead, during the funeral, going up to the grave of the departed... More
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barryjay
20 August 2015|
AnswerShow all 3 answers
Response from jewishmuseminprague | Property representative |
Yes, tours with a certified guide of the Jewish Museum in Prague are available for individual visitors as well as organized groups. Guided tours in English are held daily during the museum's opening hours usually at 10.30 am... More
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