Gippsland Attractions

Top Things to Do in Gippsland

Things to Do in Gippsland

Top Attractions in Gippsland

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*Likely to sell out: Based on Viator’s booking data and information from the provider from the past 30 days, it seems likely this experience will sell out through Viator, a Tripadvisor company.

What travellers are saying

  • roy v
    Traralgon, Australia4,431 contributions
    The Gippsland Lakes are a must place to visit or holiday at in Victoria .
    Miles of beautiful waterways fed by about six decent rivers and the only entry to the ocean is the man made entrance At the town of Lakes Entrance which is itself a major holiday destination.
    The lakes are a huge tourist attraction, boating and fishing and most water sports are carried out on these great waters . There is a big fishing fleet based at Lakes Entrance that fish the ocean waters not the lake waters.
    There are a few lovely towns on the sides of the Lakes that basically survive from the tourism the lakes bring.
    Make sure you make a trip to the lakes you will not be disappointed
    Written 25 August 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Karen A
    35 contributions
    stunning place to sit watch the wave roll in a great shop just before the beach to get that cold drink or hot coffee and nice spot to swim
    Written 13 September 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Peter S
    Rome, Italy3,723 contributions
    Review: Homestead Cemetery, Wilsons Prom, Entrance to National Park, Yanakie VIC 3960

    If you’re in Wilsons Prom you have to take time out to visit the Yanakie homestead cemetery one time to appreciate the history of where you are; not simply because of the beauty of the land around you, but for a brief understanding of what the challenges of the place would have been when it represented the ‘back-blocks’. Sure, take in your spectacular surroundings, but also reflect upon the poignancy of where you are - the five people buried there c.150 years ago. It feels hard and remote today. Imagine the choices made by the handful of early Victorian pioneers who chose to establish their homes in this isolated bush country – imagine the risks for the children raised by the families.
    You access the homestead cemetery by parking in the Stockyards Camp Ground and walking 300 metres up the shallow slope to the cemetery. You’ll see the sign board pointing the way. The Stockyards Camp Ground is across from the entrance kiosk into the park – where you stop for vehicle check-in. There are separate roads/lanes for entry and exit to the park, and it’s easier to enter the Stockyards Camp Ground from the exit road (heading towards Yanakie). So, program half-hour at the end of your day in the park for the side-trip required.
    Is it worth a visit? This depends on your interests (and your imagination) of those earlier times when Wilsons Prom was quite literally at the end of the known world. Of the five people buried in this isolated small cemetery, three were from the same family (and buried in a single grave). You can find their stories on the boards at the Stockyards Camp Ground, at the Cemetery and on the web. There was the Scotsman James McKeich who leased Yanakie Station and Mary, his wife, and their youngest son William. The latter was particularly tragic – death from falling into a tub of scalding hot water – 16-months old.
    A second grave contains the even younger 7-month old Alice Musgrave, the daughter of the lighthouse keeper at Wilsons Prom at the time - Thomas Musgrave. He held tenure 1869-78. Alice’s story is equally tragic. Falling ill she was carried on horseback across the bleak terrain of Wilsons Prom hill country only to die at Yanakie Station. She was >50 km from home with three times this distance still to travel to reach the nearest medical attention.
    The third grave is that of the Rev. William Brown an Anglican Minister from Melbourne who, according to the sign at the cemetery, fell ill and died whist visiting Yanakie Station – notwithstanding the nursing of his wife and of Mrs Davis (ex-Mrs McKeich, who had remarried after the death of her husband in 1865).
    The Rev. Brown’s grave is the only easily recognizable grave with inscribed/named headstone and decorative iron palling fence. The large white stone that also features in the cemetery is presumably that of the McKeich Family notwithstanding neither inscriptions nor identification board. There is no reference to the location/marker for the third grave – that of Alice Musgrave.
    The access path from the Stockyards Campsite was open, easy to negotiate and provided comfortable walking*. The cemetery, unfortunately, was unkempt with the two easily identified graves overgrown and difficult to appreciate. The metal fence was bent in places – suggesting … what? Damage from mowing, falling branches/timber, vandalism – surely not?
    The surrounding area within the occasional wooden posts/cross-members that provided some indication of the extend of the cemetery had been mown (and presumably is mown at irregular intervals), but was overgrown at the time of the visit with tall grasses and crowded-in with the surrounding bush/trees.
    The cemetery records the period of the early settlers/land occupation - now almost 200 years ago. Isolated rural communities such as that at Yanakie Station faced considerable hardship when setting up home and pioneering land as reflected in the loss of children and, equally, in the short life spans of the adults (when compared to the modern day). The cemetery is testament to the fortitude of these early people that we remain with the memorabilia/rewards of their times - the developed agricultural lands of East Gippsland and the security at sea provided by the lighthouse at South-East Point.
    Scope for re-developing and/or some TLC at the Cemetery by way of respect for these early people who pioneered and helped establish modern-day Mr & Mrs Australia?

    Peter Steele
    04 November 2022

    *Check out the photo of the Tiger Snake (Notechis scrutalus). This one was on the footpath to the cemetery. You’ll find a description in Wikipedia. Highly venomous. Found throughout the park. Protected with fines/prison sentences.
    Written 7 November 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Reinhardt K
    Corinella, Australia261 contributions
    Nice spot to visit. Suggest to walk to Shack bay for the day. Take water and a camera, you are sure to get some nice shots of the marine vistas and cliffs
    Written 21 November 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Anita T
    Forster, Australia11,741 contributions
    Croajingolong National Park is a wonderful unspoilt paradise in the East Gippsland region of Victoria. We were fishing at Mallacoota and used a few of the great facilities of tables, Bbqs and amenities which are located around both the Top and Bottom Lake. On the days that we did not fish we explored several different parts of this fabulous park.
    The coastline is spectacular and gives you so many photographic opportunities. We drove down to Shipwreck Creek and did part of the coastal walk. There was a camping ground here which would be a great place to have your base if you were doing lots of walks.
    Another day we drove up to Genoa Peak. It started to rain so we didn't do the walk and climb to the lookout but the drive through the forest was wonderful.
    We also drove down to Sou West Arm and Sandy Point, both give you beautiful views over Top lake and have great facilities. We also walked out along Double Creek Arm which was a bit soggy underfoot. The walk through the rainforest at Double Creek Nature walk up to the sclerophyll forest was really pretty.
    Written 16 March 2018
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Peter S
    Rome, Italy3,723 contributions
    Review of Squeaky Beach, Wilsons Prom, Victoria

    Trawl through the many TripAdvisor reviews of Squeaky Beach – one of a handful of similar magic beaches in the coastline north of Tidal River and linked by an easy-to-negotiate footpath – and there’s these overwhelming images of sand, sea and sky that dominate; in the near distance there’s a fringe of islands on the horizon. The beaches are pristine, the water turquoise in the bright sunshine and, behind the beach, there’s tree-covered slopes/hills covered in that characteristic Australian grey-green colour. Breath the marine air deep into your lungs and tell yourself that you’re in one of those unbelievable advertisements in a popular travel magazine … except you’re not … this is real-life-Wilsons-Prom-style.
    The review is in two parts. The first covers issues of water safety.
    The park is free-of-charge. The girl/man at the road kiosk checks you for dogs and then offers you ‘Welcome’ & ‘Visitor Guide’ handouts that contain a map, general information and a few lines on the many different walks, beaches and other things to do. Take note of the ‘Be Prepared & Stay Safe’ information all of which makes sense whether you’re a day-visitor, stopping over for the day or longer at Tidal River (the only commercial centre in the park) and/or a bushwalker. Crucially, there’s passing reference in the handouts to water safety.
    If you’re a TripAdvisor-kind-of-visitor, you will already have explored what the many hundreds of people who have been here before thought of the place – sharing their experience, enjoyment and more - typically positive. If you haven’t done so, check out the TA review dated 26Dec20 with fleeting reference to the dangerous nature of the largely benign-looking sea that lazily laps Squeaky Beach and the neighbouring beaches. The sea hereabouts is always neutral, but it brings risk from the unpredictable nature of the currents, steep floors and rocky shorelines. There is risk in the water for first timers, the inexperienced and, in particular, non-swimmers from being caught unawares by rips, undertows and/or ocean swells.
    Read that bit again.
    Experienced or not, do not go beyond waist depth and never take the little ones with you no matter how attractive the surfing waves. The sea is also cold such that the majority of people in the water wear wet suits, which will provide for an hour or more of submersion should the worse happens. Full length cover wetsuits are best.
    Remember, the only beach/life/saving/service available locally is at Tidal River - at Norman Beach where there was surveillance for both swimmers and surfers. Enter the water between the yellow/red flags. If you’ve little ones in your family, play with them in the creeks and rivers that can be found at either end of the beaches. Tidal River, in particular, has some great swimming/jumping holes for school-age kids.
    Secondly, there is the pleasure of Squeaky Beach.
    The name says it all … it squeaks when you walk across the sand. Except if doesn’t always (easily) squeak, but you can quickly pick up the knack of squeaky walking. We found no-squeaking close to the sea (where, presumably, there’s simply too much water in the sand) and neither did the sand squeak higher up the beach where the beach meets the path from the carpark. Too dry? You can encourage squeaky walking by ‘sledging’ with your feet (like walking up a slope in snow – pushing your feet firmly into the snow to help maintain grip). But then, once you’ve found out how to walk squeakily, the novelty wears off. Take it from me.
    We’d arrived that morning for 09.00 h with the car park close to empty - <20 cars? There’s a smart little environmentally friendly toilet (meaning ‘long-drop’ in old language) with two cubicles at the corner of the car park. From here it’s a 10 minutes/300 m bush-covered/shaded walk to the beach. Easy walking. Read the safety sign about fishing – if this is what you plan.
    We enjoyed a couple of hours fossicking along the beach, walking in the long shallow tidal waters >30 m wide between the beach and the final/first wave that breaks around knee height. At either end of the beach there’s a collection of large, stacked boulders some of which are mottled orange in colour. Novel … as if left by a bunch of giant kids playing in the sand. Water drains from behind the beach and around the rocks and into the sea; these are places to appreciate for exploring, finding shade and in which kids can play safely.
    Mid-morning and there were few people on the beach – there was a ‘Robinson Crusoe’ feel about the place (apart from the cold sea – the fictional character was shipwrecked in the Caribbean according to the story). I can’t remember if Daniel Defoe included biting flies in his story, but you’ll find them in plenty on Squeaky Beach. These are March flies and there’s >400 species in the country that feed on pollen/nectar, on farm animals/wildlife, and on you too if you let them.
    The Marchies are black and twice the size of a house fly with large green eyes and well-spaced feet, and they seem to fly around in occasional small groups; not annoying, so that you’re constantly brushing them away as a nuisance but making a direct beeline for that exposed leg, arm or back. Suddenly they’re there – three/four spaced down your leg. They look like miniature LEMs fixed rigidly to your skin (Apollo 11 13July69, remember?). Here’s where that thong/jandal/flip-flop comes in handy - be quick and you can catch them relatively easily. Fail to see them and they’ll bite (but only the female) sufficient to make you jump. They’re after your blood; hit them when their feeding and you’ll have a 50c coin size red splodge on your leg. The good news is that they’re easy to kill. Fail to kill them before they bite, and they’ll leave their anticoagulant in you that itches for a week. Try to encourage the kids not to scratch and open the wound to infection. Oh, and they’ll bite through thin clothing too.
    All the more reason to roll around in that creek wearing a wet suit.
    Returning to the car park for 11.00 h and it was completely full of cars (>50?) with others parked along the road outside and still others waiting for you to vacate your space. Where did all those people come from and where did they go? Not to the beach. Squeaky Beach and surroundings are popular during the school holidays – and rightly so - this is one spectacular image of sky, sea and hill country.

    Peter Steele
    31Jan22
    Written 3 February 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Aussie_2012
    Melbourne, Australia668 contributions
    Lovely property about 10 mins from Lakes Entrance. The homestead is open only at certain times but there is plenty of information around to learn about the place including photographs. There is a few lovely walks around the property including one down 95 steps down to the jetty with nice views and an easier walk to farm sheds. There's a small swing set for young children near the entry buildings and a small shop (again open at certain times). We were here on a windy and cold day however this would be a lovely place to picnic and venture around on a sunny day.
    Written 8 May 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Skeney57
    Sydney, Australia21,698 contributions
    Missed stopping the last time in town but made sure to visit this trip! My mate was amazed I wanted to stop but after walking in his jaw dropped and was glad I insisted on the stop. The church dates back to 1913 and has the magnificent tall tower which dominates the streetscape. But the interior murals are the star attraction. Done by an Italian artist (Franceso Floreani) in 1931, they may not match the old masters or the Sistine Chapel but are great in a country Victorian town and a tribute to the Parish forefathers. I've seen the Sistine & numerous European Cathedrals and I rate St Mary's up with the best of them. The purgatory section was worth the visit, eerie!!
    Written 23 March 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • reginaldgw
    Montrose, Australia17 contributions
    Spending a week in Lakes Entrance it was recommended that we visit Wyanga Winery for lunch. We were not disappointed. The food was excellent, the staff were very friendly and the wine (sample paddle) went down well also. The only down side was the service was slow. Other than that we would recommend.
    Written 31 October 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Sara B
    Wollongong, Australia23 contributions
    Easy to find and large carpark with modern facility. Alot of brochures on the local area and staff provided some information to direct questions but were more interested in quizzing each other on local information. Personally found the owner of where we stayed much much more helpful.
    Written 2 November 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Jenny D
    9 contributions
    This coastline is absolutely breathtaking. So many walk s and so much to see. The walking tracks appeared to have resurfaced (not sure when) but so easy underfoot. I witnessed some dolphins playing which was pretty special and the Spring colours of the native plants are beautiful. You’ll be pleasantly surprised of the regrowth after the fires of 2019/20. Mallacoota truly is a ‘hidden gem’.
    Written 29 September 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Trace L
    12 contributions
    such a wonderful diverse collection of shells. From all the over the world, spanning the decades. Definitely worth dropping in.
    Written 19 January 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Aglassortwo
    Melbourne, Australia226 contributions
    What a pleasant walk in the sunshine with a young grandchild who was enthralled by the waterbirds. Love the way it is remaining true to nature. The new toilet facility will be welcome by some, so too the additional picnic tables. Paths are well maintained and the information panels contain succinct information on history, flora and fauna of the area.
    Written 5 July 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • Vladvonbounce
    Melbourne, Australia347 contributions
    We travelled to the falls just before Christmas with my family. It was my second visit to the falls. It is a lovely walk that takes about an hour. The first section is a little steep but it isn't too bad really. The two waterfalls are both gorgeous and well worth the trip. There are lots of camping sites nearby as well.
    Written 31 December 2021
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
  • roy v
    Traralgon, Australia4,431 contributions
    Did the walk on a lovely sunny winters morning.
    A easy track well signposted , there are a few steps now and then but nothing hard.
    Plenty of little birds chirping away and darting here and there, heard the whip bird a lot but never saw one. It was nice walking in the shade of the native bush and there are seats now and then if you need a rest. There are a couple of access tracks to the Ninety Mile Beach which is beautiful. It is about 5 km return walk. Near the entrance there are a few relics to see from when the entrance was built. Notice boards give you the history of these .Also there are a few old cottages to see at the Historic Precinct, read there history too. The entrance is right on the beach so a good option is to walk back along the Ninety Mile Beach.
    A walk well worth doing, plenty to see, I was away nearly three hours.
    Written 21 August 2022
    This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews.
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