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4 nights Galway -is this too much/itinerary advice please!

10 posts
4 nights Galway -is this too much/itinerary advice please!

We are off to Galway in a couple of weeks and have 4 nights to plan. We can fly into Dublin or Shannon and will hire a car. We are not sure whether to spend all 4 nights in Galway or break it up with a night else where. We love the pub scene and all the traditional music, and have been to Dublin before. Would like to do a couple of trips maybe, can anyone help me with the planning at all , would really appreciate it!

11 replies to this topic
County Galway...
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2,961 posts
48 reviews
1. Re: 4 nights Galway -is this too much/itinerary advice please!

If you like the pubs you will love galway plenty days trips from galway

Venice, Florida
Destination Expert
for Ireland
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3,118 posts
33 reviews
2. Re: 4 nights Galway -is this too much/itinerary advice please!

Connemara 'Loop' can be a one, or two day tour.

If you're a "Quiet Man" fan (or not), a day trip to Cong might be of interest. It could be done as part of the Connemara 'Loop', or separately.

A day trip (or, better yet) an over-night on one of the Aran Islands (most choose Inishmore).

A day trip through the Burren with a stop at the Cliffs of Moher might appeal.

FYI -- Galway is a bit far from either airport for your last night unless you have a late afternoon or evening flight.

Reno, Nevada
Level Contributor
2,368 posts
298 reviews
3. Re: 4 nights Galway -is this too much/itinerary advice please!

I could spend the rest of my life in Galway. There is plenty in the area to keep you busy and happy for a short 4 days.

boston, ma
Destination Expert
for Western Ireland
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2,033 posts
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4. Re: 4 nights Galway -is this too much/itinerary advice please!

If you want to spend one night in the heart of Connemara Clifden is a lovely town. You should be able to find pubs and music there also.

10 posts
5. Re: 4 nights Galway -is this too much/itinerary advice please!

Many thanks for all your help, we have now booked 4 nights in Galway plus a hire car so have lots of choices on what to do. Thanks for all your help and advice. Cant wait!! :-)

Galway, Ireland
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for Connemara, The Burren, Galway, Western Ireland
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3,868 posts
101 reviews
6. Re: 4 nights Galway -is this too much/itinerary advice please!

(1) Forthill Cemetery - It's been in continual use since the 1500s and witnessed the gruesome beheading of 300 shipwrecked Spanish sailors who were put to death in 1589 by Sir William Fitzwilliam. There is a small plaque commemorating the tragic event but it's one of the few in Ireland that is inscribed in both Irish and Spanish negating the English language. An intended snub to the language of the perpetrator. The cemetery is located right around the corner from the Harbour Hotel heading towards Lough Atalia.

(2)  Claddagh Arts Centre: Located on Upper Fairhill Road in the Claddagh and just a short stroll from Galway City centre. This locally owned arts centre has grown in recent years and this year sees the opening of “Katie's Cottage” - a must see if you want to see how people lived in times gone by. Lots of locally sourced stone, wood, hand carved giftware made to customer requirements with many more gifts available in the showroom. Stay for a cup of tea/coffee and learn more about Irish culture and heritage. Check the website for opening hours.

(3) A Galway landmark that has been happening every Saturday morning for as long as anyone can remember. The Galway market fills the streets around St Nicholas Church and is the place to see and sample the many wholesome and dairy delights the county has to offer. It's a great local market that is a blended mixture of local food producers and artisans selling their wares

(4) William Street West – Lower Dominick Street area: Let the visitors jostle for places and space in and around the Quay Street area and head on over the bridge and go where many of the locals frequent. This small compact area has an array of coffee shops, bars and a restaurant or two. Definitely worth a visit if staying in and around Galway.

(5) Just down from the Quays Pub lies a remarkable insight into mediaeval Galway: The Hall of the Red Earl in the heart of Galway remains one of the city’s top visitor attractions. The site which dates from the 13th century is now linked to the founding of Galway by the Anglo-Norman De Burgo family.  FREE ENTRY

(6) It's often described as "the smallest museum in Europe with the biggest gift shop". It proudly houses some of the very first Claddagh rings made by Goldsmiths Nicholas Burge, Richard Joyce and George Robinson - from 1700-1800. It also displays the "world's smallest Claddagh ring" which is on the top of a tailor's pin. Located on Quay Street.

(7) Galway now boasts two Michel Star restaurants at Aniar and Loam, but if you are looking for something more homely (and also offering up some terrific outdoor summer seating), pop down to the Latin Quarter around the Quay Street – Cross Street – High Street area. Amble through an array of great restaurants and bars all offering a unique aspect to Galway's growing reputation as a haven for foodies. There are many other fine eating establishments all over the city centre too. If you are in town around Easter – the Galway Food Festival is usually in full swing and always serves up something for everyone.

(8) Shop Street is the main thoroughfare in the city centre which is also completely pedestrianised offering more time to watch and listen to some of the finest street performers and buskers that the country has to offer.

(9) Eyre Square is an ideal place to watch the “world go by”. In 1965, the square was officially renamed "John F. Kennedy Memorial Park" in honour of John F. Kennedy, who visited Galway city and made a speech in the square on 29 June 1963. The first U.S. President to do so during his term of office. Since its recent redevelopment the finished square received the Irish Landscape Institute Design Award in 2007.

(10) Irish music in Galway - several places around town but The Crane Bar on Sea Road is a great option. Get there early as it's often standing room only!

(11) Sample the wonderful theatrical tradition Galway has to offer: (12) Druid Theatre – an iconic and long-established award-winning theatre, famed for staging experimental works by young Irish playwrights, as well as new adaptations of the classics. Located off Quay Street in an old tea warehouse. (A) A Galway institution - An Taibhdhearc offers many of the classic and new adaptations in Irish and English - the atmosphere is simply enough to experience. There are also many concerts held here too – check the website for details. (B) Town Hall Theatre: Always something on from musicals to dance to performing arts at this Galway landmark. Check local listings for details.

(13) Galway Cathedral and St Nicholas' Collegiate Church – two architectural landmarks open to visitors throughout the day. Notice the two-foot high boundary wall circling the Galway Cathedral – these are the partial remains of the old Galway gaol and once inside marvel at the Connemara Marble floor. See if you can locate the mosaic of President John F Kennedy.

(14) Galway City Museum. Located close to the Spanish Arch. This museum is a spacious modern building, situated in the heart of the city on the banks of the River Corrib. The museum contains a variety of permanent and touring exhibitions delving into Galway's rich archaeological and historical past. FREE

(15) Down by the Waterside: A local Galway secret. This is an oasis of tranquillity right in the city centre on the banks of the River Corrib behind the Town Hall Theatre. Walk back towards the three concrete towers jutting out of the water – these are the partial remains of the old Galway - Clifden railway line that is sadly no more.

(16) Galway is the ideal city to explore on foot. Some terrific walks along the Eglington Canal up to the university campus - but the most popular of all is down by the Claddagh and out to Salthill. It's an ideal way to engage with the locals. Don't forget to “kick the wall” at Blackrock!

(17) The Corrib Princess: during the summertime take a guided boat trip up the River Corrib from Woodquay - a very pleasant way to spend an afternoon or evening (bar onboard too). Summer only

(18) Fish and Chips – Fisherman Seafood Bar and Grill in Salthill. McDonagh's on Quay Street Galway. Fish and Chips at Hooked is located on Henry Street. All extensively reviewed on Trip Advisor.

(19) Galway Fisheries Watchtower Museum: Located right on the banks of the River Corrib - Known as the Fishery Watchtower and also as the Tower Station, it is the only building of its kind in the whole country. Dating from 1853 and built by the Ashworth family. It's staffed by a group of volunteers and I believe it's free entry too.

(20) Charlie Byrne's Bookstore: Middle Street Galway. A treasure trove of used, second hand and new books and a personal favourite of mine. A great source of Irish History books too, with super-friendly staff to assist. There's also the warehouse in Oranmore too with lots of books for sale.

(21) An Gailearai Beag at 4 Flood Street: Located right around the corner from Charlie Byrne's bookstore. Lots of old antiques and trinkets on sale here. You never know what you might dig at up this long established independent store. No. 4 Flood Street

(22) Galway Arts Centre: 47 Dominick Street. Located at Number 47 Dominick Street. A 3,000 sq ft gallery, showing national and international contemporary arts housed in a building dating from the1840's. Admission is free and everyone is welcome. This building also hosts a wide range of activities from classes in art, writing and photography to workshops in drama, music and voice.

(23) Griffin's Bakery Shop Street: Originally established in 1876 this iconic bakery is still serving up the finest of bread and cakes. Pop in a gaze at the array of delicious home-made chocolate and tempting treats.

(24) Celia Griffin Memorial Park: Grattan Road. The park at Grattan Beach has been named for Celia Griffin and is dedicated to all the children who lost their lives in the Great Famine including a monument to the 100 famine ships which sailed out of Galway between the years 1847 and 1850. These ships saved the lives of many thousands of people and the services of their captains and crews ought not to be forgotten. The stone monuments bear the names of these ships

(25) Nora Barnacle Museum – 8 Bowling Green Galway: James Joyce's Galway-born wife lived here in the early 1900s. Said to be the smallest house on the street, the small museum displaying the couple's letters and photographs among the period furniture. Looking all of its 100 years, the house had no running water until the 1940s; instead, the Barnacle family used a communal pump across the street. Unfortunately, it seems to open sporadically, but worth stopping by if you are in the area. It's a very short walk from Eyre Square

(26) No visit to the city is complete without a stop at Kirwan's Lane. This is one of the original medieval laneways in Galway and is located in what is now referred to as the Latin Quarter. The wider area has been significantly restored over the past several years and has reignited the heart of Galway’s historical town centre. Additionally, it is also home to many bohemian-style cafes, street buskers and performers, restaurants, bars and craft shops

(27) Cupán Tae: Located across from Jurys Hotel: A traditional styled Irish Tea Shop specialising in quality home baking using only the best of local Galway produce. Styled in a 1920's theme throughout, the interior décor reflects a time long gone. Tea and other beverages are only served in fine China with the tables set in the best of linen and lace. Sample one of thirty different types of herbal loose-leaf teas. If the weather is up, combine the tradition of afternoon tea sitting outside watching the world and in this case, Galway City go by.

(28)  Menlough Castle: Easily found after driving past Eamonn Deacy Park home of Galway United Football Club and keeping left all the way until you encounter the exterior entrance, consisting of a small tower at the entrance. The large gate may be closed but most people walk around it. You can also view the castle from the opposite of the River Corrib along the walkway that straddles the university campus. Menlough Castle: Nestled along the banks of the River Corrib, it was originally constructed in 1569 and was the ancestral home of the Blake family until July 1910 when disaster struck and the castle was destroyed by fire. Up until 1910, Menlough Castle was the home of Sir Valentine Blake the 14th Baronet, his wife and their daughter Miss Eleanor Blake. In July of that year, Sir Valentine was in Dublin for a number of days undergoing an operation. On a fateful night in 1910, a fire broke out on the suite of rooms occupied by Miss Blake who could not escape because of her disability and was engulfed in the blazing inferno.

(29) Lynch's Castle: This well-preserved edifice is located on Shop Street in the heart of Galway. Definitely Galway’s best example of a fortified house, built by the prosperous Lynch family in the 16th century. Its exterior is adorned with Spanish decorative motifs and finely carved gargoyles or water spouts that project outwards from the building. The Lynch coat-of-arms is to be found at the front of the building. Today sees a branch of the Allied Irish Bank located on the premises of Lynch’s Castle.

(30) Galway City Cycling Tours: A great way to explore the city with a guided tour heading out to the Famine Memorial in Lower Salthill. Check the website for more details

(31) Galway Bay Boat Tours: Running trips out on the bay in the summer months. Check the website for more details.

(32) Galway Food Tours: A unique culinary walking tour of Galway operated by Sheena Dignam. People will get the opportunity to try local produce ranging from oysters (Saturday) to cheese; Sushi to Crab and Doughnuts to Strawberry tarts and some local local beers, Check the website for additional details.

Reno, Nevada
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2,368 posts
298 reviews
7. Re: 4 nights Galway -is this too much/itinerary advice please!

Thanks, Damian: Even after a few visits to Galway I am shocked by the number of these attractions that I have missed in the past. Nice list for next visit. We are going to spend all of our time in Galway and points north. :-)

Galway, Ireland
Destination Expert
for Connemara, The Burren, Galway, Western Ireland
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3,868 posts
101 reviews
8. Re: 4 nights Galway -is this too much/itinerary advice please!

Eddie,

As you well know there's also a great buzz around the town - it's like no other. :-)

grimsby
Level Contributor
45 posts
6 reviews
9. Re: 4 nights Galway -is this too much/itinerary advice please!

Hope the OP doesn't mind me hijacking the thread. Im looking at a 4 day trip staying at Galway but wouldn't mind splitting the trip. Im into my photography and wouldn't mind staying in a 'real' Irish Town/village after or before the hustle and bustle of Galway. Ive short listed the Aasleagh Falls, the Clifden area, Burren National Park and Doolin. Any suggestions appreciated

Reno, Nevada
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2,368 posts
298 reviews
10. Re: 4 nights Galway -is this too much/itinerary advice please!

Clifden

Edited: 01 March 2018, 04:50
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