We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The TripAdvisor website may not display properly.
We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.

Crossing King Hussein Bridge/Allenby Bridge in Jordan/Israel

Newcastle upon...
Level Contributor
6 posts
27 reviews
Save Topic
Crossing King Hussein Bridge/Allenby Bridge in Jordan/Israel

I thought I would write this to help people when crossing the border from Jordan to Israel via King Hussein Bridge and to know what to expect.

Ive just come back from Jordan and Israel last week and would like to share the following:

Crossing from Jordan to Israel, firstly we paid 20jd from Amman to King Hussein Bridge for a taxi but you could negotiate this lower. It takes an hour. There is a servee (local bus) that also takes you there for 3jd from Abdali bus station.

Upon arrival at the bridge (known as King Hussein to Jordanians and Allenby to Israelis), you are ushered in to a building by the locals to see the authorities regarding passports. There are 3 counters; first one you hand your passport over, the official checks it (expect a delay, especially if coaches are outside). Counter 3 is where you pay your exit tax of 5jd. Counter 2 is where you return once you have the stamps off counter 3 and the official from counter 1 enters the 'stamps' on a piece of paper then stamps over papers. You are not stamped out of the country in your passport. He then keeps the passports. You then go outside and board the jett bus for 2.5jd. You need to pay luggage too if you have any for 1.75jd. Watch the ticket giver as he claims not to have 'any change'. Passports are then given back to you on the bus and it then sets off. Journey takes a few minutes. Not so bad...

The stress starts when you get off at the Israeli side. You disembark and see outside where the bags are to be dropped off to be scanned through their machines. This is fairly chaotic and can be crowded. You are given a ticket which you retain stating how many bags you have/don't have and they look at your passports. You then walk in and show your passport again to a girl on the desk before walking through the x-ray machine. You then enter enter the next hall which is very crowded yet there is a kiosk for tourists. Make no mistake, this queue can be as long or as short as you like depending on how many bus loads have been dropped off before you. If like us, you also have the misfortune to be stuck behind someone with a dual passport, expect a longer delay. We waited 45 minutes in this queue alone. You then are questioned by the girl behind the counter as to why you are visiting and you need to show evidence of your trip. You are then stamped in (on passport) and asked to go round the corner where you find another booth where you have your photo taken and fingerprints. Following this, you then again have to queue for another counter further on where you are again quizzed on why you are visiting Israel by a girl who also checks your passports in a suspicious manners. You walk through the barrier, then go to another desk and the girl checks your passport again! Finally, you can see a collection of bags on the ground in front of you. If yours is not there, then you have been unlucky and it is located in a room awaiting your arrival so they can open it in front of you and quiz you again. Finally, following this, you are FREE!

This whole process took 2.5 hours but we could have been there longer. I found entering Israel very stressful but it is worth it once you get there if you are visiting Jerusalem etc.

Returning to Allenby/King hussein bridge is somewhat less traumatic. We got a taxi from Damascus gate in Jerusalem which cost 175 shekels and takes 40 minutes roughly. We could have got this cheaper but the driver insisted no-one would take us for less than 200 shekels so we just accepted our fate as we were in a hurry.

Unfortunately, as you approach the border along a long road, there is a check-point and you could be held up here ages (whilst in taxi or bus) due there being only one guard who checks all vehicles and quizzes you whilst the others sit around and look pretty. He asks if you are carrying any weapons! If you are in a taxi, you have to wait for all the coaches to go through first so you could be waiting an hour or so to get through the checkpoint like us which is very frustrating.

Once through, you leave the taxi and enter the building. Pay departure tax of 161.5 shekels (disgraceful) and then show passport to desk and get stamped out. Queue not too bad for this. You then wait outside for jett bus. Again, pay 2.75jd to ride the bus the short distance and pay the luggage cost if necessary. Half way along the drive the officals enter the bus and check passports then take them. Once off the bus you walk through the x-ray machine in the building, scan your bags and wait at the counter for the official to look at your passport and then hand it back to you. You are not stamped back in if you left here originally to enter Israel. Visas are not granted at this bridge so you will need one already if using this route.

This is the end of the nightmare! Hurrah! Board the servee bus outside back to Amman for 3jd and be relieved that it is all finally over!

Perth, Australia
Destination Expert
for Syria, Aleppo, Jordan
Level Contributor
7,517 posts
41 reviews
Save Reply
1. Re: Crossing King Hussein Bridge/Allenby Bridge in Jordan/Israel

Hi

Thanks for detailed accurate colourful account of your border crossing.

The 20 JOD from Amman to Bridge is reasonable these days given distance and downhill uphill road and cost of petrol.I think

The taxi cost from Jerusalem to bridge is also reasonable,around 200 shekel You have done very well in that regard.

there is only one bus a day that service the bridge from Amman.

It is worth mentioning there is a VIP service which could make the process of border crossing easier for the cost of i think usd 100..

OKC
Level Contributor
217 posts
19 reviews
Save Reply
2. Re: Crossing King Hussein Bridge/Allenby Bridge in Jordan/Israel

Just to add few notes upon excellent Xena suggestions.

1- You could ask not to stamp on your PP if you don't want Isreal stamp for any good reason. Maybe few more questions as usual from Immigration officer "WHY"..But mostly they will obliged your request. We did for last 2 trips and no problem.

2- As for your luggagues - we put color ribbons at handle or some kind of markers which stand out among several bags.

We safe our paper Israel stamps for future trip and hope it will help. Have a good trip in Jordan and Israel.

Newcastle upon...
Level Contributor
6 posts
27 reviews
Save Reply
3. Re: Crossing King Hussein Bridge/Allenby Bridge in Jordan/Israel

Somehow I doubt that by paying an extortionate fee for a supposed 'VIP' service would make the border crossing any easier. It is just another way of obtaining additional funds from westerners I think. We were at the VIP counter (as part of tourist counter) and no-one was ushered through at all during our long wait there...

Yes, I did forget to mention that you can opt not to have your passport stamped at the Immigration counter entering Israel however you are quizzed that little bit more should you ask for this.

As for there only being one servee bus per day from Abdali Bus station in Amman to the Border, that is debatable according to a local source.

St. Augustine, FL
Level Contributor
2 posts
18 reviews
Save Reply
4. Re: Crossing King Hussein Bridge/Allenby Bridge in Jordan/Israel

Many thanks for your details; we wondered how long it would take and what we would encounter. Appreciate you taking the time to spell it out.

St. Augustine, FL
Level Contributor
2 posts
18 reviews
Save Reply
5. Re: Crossing King Hussein Bridge/Allenby Bridge in Jordan/Israel

Forgot to ask one question? You mention the bus station...is that near the airport - or is there service from the Amman airport to Allenby? Thanks

brodie319
2 posts
Save Reply
6. Re: Crossing King Hussein Bridge/Allenby Bridge in Jordan/Israel

What time did you have to return to the bridge to leave Israel? I've read that the bridge closes at 4pm. How much time would you recommend allotting to make the journey back to Jordan from Jerusalem to avoid getting 'stuck' for the night?

Also, did you do a day trip? How long did you end up having in Jerusalem?

Austin, Texas
1 post
Save Reply
7. Re: Crossing King Hussein Bridge/Allenby Bridge in Jordan/Israel

I just crossed the Bridge a week ago, in June 2010. Costs have gone up. We paid 35 jd to get from Old Amman to the bridge. Once at the Jordan checkpoint, there was no exit fee. We paid 10 JD - a compulsory fee to get on the bus that goes 3 km. I think luggage was an extra 1.5 jd per bag. There was indeed someone who was invited to pay $US 100 to take the VIP route.

As we approached the Israeli checkpoint, the bus driver was told to pull over and wait, for no apparent reason. The waiting continued for 3 hours, and the bus driver was never told why. The view was mounds of gravel and barbed wire. We were at the front of the line, and watched VIP cars going through the checkpoint, as well as empty Israeli buses, but not one bus with passengers was allowed to enter. This must have caused complete chaos at the Jordanian side. We were lucky that our bus was air conditioned - others waiting to board buses must have suffered horribly in the heat.

When we got to the terminal, it was empty. The process as described above is chaotic. You have to be aggressive in getting through, because there appears to be no rhyme or reason to anything that occurs. Young girls with machine guns stand around watching you. At the booth we were interrogated with useless questions by a young girl. My girlfriend and I were asked if we sleep together. Yes, be prepared for inane questions. When we said we were staying at Jaffa Gate in Old Jerusalem, the girl looked puzzled - she had obviously never heard of the most famous place in Israel.

When we got to the curb to get transportation to Jerusalem, my friend haggled over the price. We ended up in a van that takes us to the Damascus Gate in the Old City. We paid 25jd. The journey took no more than 30 minutes.

If you want to get anywhere on time, avoid this bridge altogether and take the Sheikh Hussein bridge. A friend had taken that route a few days early and crossed over in 15 minutes. It's out of the way, and more costly to get there, but you avoid the ugliness and unpredictability of this crossing.

Shame on you Israel. You do an excellent job of deterring tourists from entering your country. Your chaos belongs in another century. Your interrogation of world citizens is disgraceful - and unforgettable.

Karen

Jerusalem
4 posts
1 review
Save Reply
8. Re: Crossing King Hussein Bridge/Allenby Bridge in Jordan/Israel

If anyone wants to complain about the israeli procedure at the Bridge (and they should) email: Nancy Sheldaz: Nancys@tourism.gov.il

Cairo
Level Contributor
272 posts
2 reviews
Save Reply
9. Re: Crossing King Hussein Bridge/Allenby Bridge in Jordan/Israel

Hi

We crossed to Israel on the 13th Jun and returned the 18th Jun, posted a review in another thread,

tripadvisor.com/ShowTopic-g293986-i3134-k368…

Alot depends on the the luck of the day, everyone understands the tensions, plan that its going to best part of a day, from Amman to Jerusalem maybe you will get lucky and get thru in less.

We had allowed the whole day, for the crossing and anything extra that we managed to fit in was a bonus, we left at 7am and were in our apartment in Jerusalem around midday, even though the crossing was a little stressful for the kids, but thats the fun of travel.

Edited: 16 July 2010, 00:12
Singapore
Level Contributor
327 posts
80 reviews
Save Reply
10. Re: Crossing King Hussein Bridge/Allenby Bridge in Jordan/Israel

Thanks to all of you for your trip reports.

Can anyone tell me when should I come to the King Hussein bridge crossing so that I can have a good chance to clear the border quickly?

I don't mind getting up very early in the morning to avoid the crowd.

Regards.

Rony

Singapore