We noticed that you're using an unsupported browser. The Tripadvisor website may not display properly.We support the following browsers:
Windows: Internet Explorer, Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome. Mac: Safari.
Full-Day Preah Vihear, Koh Ker and Beng Mealea Private Tour
10

Check availabilityView full product details
  
Ways to Experience Preah Vihear Temple
Reviews (541)
Filter reviews
541 results
Traveller rating
406
111
13
7
4
Traveller type
Time of year
LanguageAll languages
More languages
Traveller rating
406
111
13
7
4
Show reviews that mention
All reviews thai border the cliff pickup truck siem reap steep road long drive hill top khmer kings thailand soldiers motorbike temple steps complex
Selected filters
Filter
Updating list...
214 - 219 of 541 reviews
Reviewed 15 October 2014

I went to Preah Vihear Temple with a group of 10 and it was an amazing place to have a picnic, walk and enjoy the views. Our friends went as far as we could until we ran into border guards who were very friendly with us.

I know in my home country and other Western countries advise travelers not to go because it's dangerous but really if there was an actual conflict, which there sometimes is, they close it off to tourists during that time.

I'd go again.

Date of experience: November 2013
1  Thank Mel C
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Reviewed 9 October 2014

I tried to reach Preah Vihear from Kantharalak, Thailand, but that border had been closed due to border disputes, and no consistent public transport really existed that I knew of. I ended up hiring a driver from the guesthouse I booked into. The driver mentioned that it would be a lot easier if I just went to Phu Singh and looked through a telescope to see Preah Vihear from Thailand. He implied that it was quite difficult to get to Preah Vihear. In my mind, I was going, no matter what, even if I had to ride a horse across the mountains. We left Kantharalak at 5:30 a.m. and arrived at Choam immigration checkpoint about 2 hours later. The roads were mostly paved, save for a few massive potholes. Choam border crossing is the home of a casino, and Preah Vihear was about 250 km away. The only way to get there was to hire a private car and driver. One of the Cambodian immigration officers arranged all of this for me, and a few hours later, after several stops at military checkpoints, we arrived at the base of the Dangrek Mountains around 10:30 am. I don't think my driver had been to Preah Vihear prior, because he stopped for directions on several occasions. The non-descript ticket booth offered tickets to the temple on a donation basis, as well as a motorbike with driver to take me up the mountain to the temple for $5/roundtrip. The driver was obviously extremely skilled because the 525 meters on a severe uphill slope to Preah Vihear Temple was quite treacherous. The path towards the temple was stone, and eroded in many places by streams of natural spring water. It was quite slippery and my flip flops didn't really have any tread left. I saw three flags on my left, the UNESCO flag, the United Nations Flag, and the Cambodian flag, and directly behind them were my long awaited ruins. The temple was built on a north to south axis, unlike most Angkor structures that were build in a rectangle. Much of the temple had suffered damage from AK practice and crossfire, but still appeared majestic to me, all 800 meters of it. The view from the top of the temple is breathtaking, you can see the Thai side of the mountains, and if you're lucky, a Khmer soldier will lend you his telescope. I was able to look through the telescope and see a red gazebo filled with tourists and a few Thai soldiers, on the Thai side. There were no tourists from where I was standing on Cambodian soil. If you're in Southeast Asia and are able to make the journey, this temple is a must-do.

Date of experience: October 2014
2  Thank amytendstowander
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Reviewed 19 September 2014

The area of this temple is disputed between Cambodia and Thailand. So i went there with my colleagues and lecturers from international law department of our university. It's a 5-hour trip from Siem Reap and 30-mins ride on truck to reach the top of the mountain. So literally it's a temple on the top of a mountain with a 7-story high of temples. You have got to reach the top of the temple to see scenic view that will take your breath away. it was insanely beautiful! so the long-hour trip was worth it.

Date of experience: September 2014
3  Thank turgen
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Reviewed 1 September 2014

I have been to Preah Vihear recently, it is one of great monuments built by the Khmer kings, it is about 1000 year olds. The temple located on the high hill of the mountain that split Cambodia and Thailand. This temple is unlike others in Angkor because its base and some parts of the walls is original stone of the mountain cut in shape of construction. There is a nice view looking to the range of mountains around. There are many long walkways form the bottom to the top. It was a good journey of 3-3.30 hours drive from Siem Reap town, the road is good with all nice landscape, forests houses of new settlement. It good to depart early in the morning as it is far.

Date of experience: July 2014
2  Thank TesChaya
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
Reviewed 21 August 2014

We were taken to a ticketing center at the foothill of the temple area where we paid for our entrance fee and also a truck to take us part way up the windy road. The front stretch of the road is new and well constructed but it stops halfway and the rest of the road looks old. Even this old road does not lead all the way to the temple area, we had to get down and walk. But the view up the top was magnificent. The temple is laid out like a straight line, with 5 separate blocks. So take your time and do not use up all your SD card memory at the first two blocks. If you want to give alms to the people there, then be prepared with lots of small change (US$1).

Date of experience: August 2014
2  Thank Pak Soon L
This review is the subjective opinion of a Tripadvisor member and not of Tripadvisor LLC. Tripadvisor performs checks on reviews as part of our industry-leading trust & safety standards. Read our transparency report to learn more.
View more reviews